API Scavenger Hunt Recap and Solution

Last weekend we ran a Family Guy Themed API Scavenger Hunt, and this was our question:

Peter Griffin wants to Video Chat with a well known Tech Consultant named Song Zheng to find out what tech trends he should invest in. After scouring the interwebz, a wise cat told him that Song is an evangelist at TokBox and his ApiKey is “25925352”. He is always connected to the session ‘2_MX4yNTkyNTM1Mn4xMjcuMC4wLjF-V2VkIE1heSAyOSAxNzoxMjozNyBQRFQgMjAxM34wLjk0MjQ2NjQ0fg’. To connect to that session, the wise cat has also intelligently acquired the access token:

"T1==cGFydG5lcl9pZD0yNTkyNTM1MiZzZGtfdmVyc2lvbj10YnJ1YnktdGJyYi12MC45MS4yMDExLTAyLTE3JnNpZz00YTNjYjk5ZThhOGVhNTMxOWMyYmY3NzQzNmM5MmRmNTgzNDIyNzc2OnJvbGU9cHVibGlzaGVyJnNlc3Npb25faWQ9Ml9NWDR5TlRreU5UTTFNbjR4TWpjdU1DNHdMakYtVjJWa0lFMWhlU0F5T1NBeE56b3hNam96TnlCUVJGUWdNakF4TTM0d0xqazBNalEyTmpRMGZnJmNyZWF0ZV90aW1lPTEzNjk4NzI3NjAmbm9uY2U9MC42MDQ5NzIyNjY5NDExNDA4JmV4cGlyZV90aW1lPTEzNzI0NjQ3NjUmY29ubmVjdGlvbl9kYXRhPQ=="

To solve this puzzle, you would have to connect to Song’s session and subscribe to his video stream using WebRTC. You might also want to publish your video as well so he can see you.

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Firefox support opens up new world of WebRTC possibilities

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We’re incredibly pleased to see Mozilla launch Firefox with WebRTC enabled by default.  With Mozilla’s Firefox joining the WebRTC family, millions of people will have the opportunity to experience high-quality plugin-free face-to-face video within web applications.

TokBox’s OpenTok platform provides APIs and infrastructure that make it incredibly easy for web and mobile developers to build and deploy WebRTC-powered video applications.  WebRTC enables Firefox to give Javascript access to your webcam and microphone, and supports powerful P2P networking protocols.

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The Great API Scavenger Hunt

This weekend is going to be an action packed Family Guy Themed API Scavenger Hunt!
stewie-family-guy-29507418-2560-1758

Thanks to SignalFire‘s creative efforts , you will get to role play as a Family Guy character solving puzzles and winning points through reading documentation and using APIs to help you through your journey. The guys from Pearson Developers explains it best:

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Building a Simple Video Chatroom with Flask and OpenTok

OpenTok Flask Demo
This tutorial will show you how to create a simple, yet functional video chatroom using the OpenTok API and Flask. Flask is a python based micro-framework to create web apps.

The App

The app we’ll be creating will be a simple website which will allow you to instantly create a video chatroom.

Setup

So, let’s get started! First of all, you’ll need to install Flask. Then, create a new folder and inside, make a new file called main.py.

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TDHack: A chance to explore the Tel Aviv developer community

What happens when you take an API evangelist for OpenTok and introduce him to a bunch of developers in a place he’s never been to, for example Tel Aviv? Yeah, I had no idea either. It turns out that in a place like Tel Aviv, where there are some brilliant startups springing up, there’s no shortage of awesome developers with endless creativity.

TDHack, the first Telefonica Digital Israel hackathon, took place this past weekend. I saw it not only as an opportunity to go meet some our extended family, but to jump out of the American startup scene that I know so well and see how things are different (or the same) in Israel.

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Can Some One Turn Me On?

Here’s our dirty little secret: for the longest time, our little team here at TokBox never used TokBox to talk to each other. There was no need. We all worked together in our Wes Anderson-esque office in SOMA, ate lunch together around our big table, and went for coffee breaks together at Epicenter on Harrison Street.

Then last summer I moved to NYC. I learned quickly that it’s tough to get a team that doesn’t have a remote co-working culture to pick it up right away — not even a team that works on video chat. Desk drive-bys for quick questions became long IM threads. Impromptu meetings with the whiteboard became “oops we forgot to call you” or “dammit, I can’t see the whiteboard” fails. Casual lunch conversation became…nothing.

We got better at this, but the turning point was when Double Robotics loaned us a Double to beta test (Disclosure! TokBox powers the video component for Double). We affectionately named it J9000.

My Double and I are about the same height.

J9000 and I are about the same height.

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Mantis Checklist – How to get started with Mantis

We just launched Mantis yesterday, and saw a rush of activity as partners hopped onto the WebRTC cloud. The new things people will be able to build – a real-time, online dungeons and dragons web app, seminar applications, education applications, and more – are now going to see a whole new level of quality and experience. We’re really excited to be the face-to-face video platform that helps make this happen. But to make it happen more quickly, we’ve decided to write a quick Mantis checklist. To make your Mantis application work, you will need to:

  • Make sure that you are using the OpenTok on WebRTC JS library. You can find the library here, and find the reference documentation here. If you are using the v1.1 JS library, you will need to update your application to the v2.0 library.
  • When you generate a session, make sure that the p2p.preference flag is set to disabled. If you’re generating your sessions from the Developer Dashboard, then you will need to download one of our server-side SDKs and generate sessions yourself.
  • If you haven’t already asked to participate in the Mantis beta, please contact us. Then make sure that you are using the correct API key for the Mantis beta. If you are not sure which API key you sent us, then please email us, and we will let you know. Mantis requires that your API key be enabled to access the infrastructure.
  • [UPDATE] Good news!  As of 10/1/13 Mantis is available in production. That means you no longer have to email the TokBox team to request access. Mantis is subject to the new OpenTok platform pricing which you can review here. Free access to Mantis is available through our new 30-day free trial.

It really is that quick, and if you’re finding that you need some more help, then let us know. To make sure that your question gets answered as quickly as possible, please send an email to support@tokbox.com using the following template:

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Mantis: Next-generation Cloud Technology for WebRTC

OpenTok_allplatforms (1)Today we’re proud to announce our latest WebRTC innovation: Mantis, a cloud-scaling infrastructure for our OpenTok on WebRTC platform.

This is another big step forward for the TokBox team as we continue to pursue our goal of providing application developers with simple yet powerful APIs. APIs that not only leverage the latest standards to deliver the best possible experience, but that are backed by a scalable, smart cloud which supports interoperability across a variety of end-points.

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Firepad Plugin: WebRTC video collaboration

Yesterday Firebase launched Firepad, a Firebase-powered open source collaborative text editor. Here’s the product pitch, Michael Lehenbauer says it best:

Firepad provides true collaborative editing, complete with intelligent OT-based merging and conflict resolution. It’s full-featured and has support for both rich text and code editing. Some of its features include cursor position synchronization, undo / redo, text highlighting, user attribution, presence detection, and version checkpointing.

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New changes for WebRTC in Chrome 26

A new version of Chrome is out, and with it changes in the WebRTC stack. We dug through the commit logs for Chrome 26, and found the following list of WebRTC bug fixes, enhancements, and updates that we thought were relevant to the OpenTok community:

Highlights

  • A lot of audio bugs in WebRTC were fixed dealing with crashes and non-standard audio bitrates
  • Chrome on Android can now be WebRTC-enabled by enabling a flag
  • Improvements to the connectivity stack in WebRTC
  • Ability to set media constraints for audio

Full list

  • Avoids crash in WebRTC audio clients for unsupported capture sample rates.
  • Avoids crash in WebRTC audio clients for 96kHz render rate on Mac OSX.
  • Enable webrtc build on android.
  • Set WebMediaPlayerMS network state to loading instead of loaded
    • This indirectly fixes the problem where WebRTC audio is muted upon refresh. The HTMLMediaElement will try to cache fully Loaded videos when the element is destructed. This will signal to the HTMLMediaElement that the player was destroyed when loading, so it needs to recreate WebMediaPlayerMS upon destruction of the media tag.
  • Allowing multiple MediaPlayers to connect to WebRtcAudioDeviceImpl by sharing one WebRtcAudioRenderer.
    •  The audio is gone when new PeerConnection is connecting to a media stream. What is happening is that the stream will pause the existing MediaPlayer and create new MediaPlayers to associated to it. But since we only allow one WebRtcAudioRenderer to connect to WebRtcAudioDeviceImpl, the new MediaPlayers audio won’t be able to associate to stream.

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